Peak Design calls out Amazon for making a ‘copycat’ of its Everyday Sling

Peak Design has taken to YouTube to call out Amazon for what it claims is a ‘knockoff’ version of its Everyday Sling that appears in the company's Basics range. In lighthearted video entitled 'A Tale of Two Slings', Peak Design highlights similarities between the $21 Amazon Basics Everyday Sling Bag and the company’s $80 Everyday Sling Bag, which was first released in 2017. The San Francisco-based company refrains from directly attacking Amazon, opting instead to highlight – in rather a tongue-in-cheek way – the difference in materials, workmanship, sustainability and labor practices used in the production of the camera bag, noting ‘you get what you pay for.’ A screenshot from the video showing the Amazon Basics Everyday Sling (black, left) compared to the Peak Design Everyday Sling (grey, right). ‘Designing incredible products is hard work. It takes years to dial in the materials, the features, the details,’ says Peak Design in an email newsletter accompanied by the video. ‘When we found out Amazon copied the design (and name) of our Everyday Sling and started selling it as their own, we had a bit of a moment.’ In response, Peak Design says it ‘got the grumpies out of [its] system real fast’ by making the video. A screenshot of the Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L product page on Amazon. As of the time of publication, Amazon had already changed the name of the bag to ‘Amazon Basics Camera Bag.’ It was previously called the Amazon Basics Everyday Sling. In the video’s description, Peak Design says: ‘It’s our goal to make the best things. If we tried to make the cheapest things, we wouldn’t be us. Amazon reminded us of that. We appreciate the pep talk, Amazon.’ Peak Design concludes the description thanking its customers for 'supporting intense, obsessive design that focuses on novel solutions to real problems [and] design practices that account for a product’s lifecycle, and its external impact on people and the planet. DPReview is an editorially independent, wholly-owned subsidiary of Amazon

Peak Design calls out Amazon for making a ‘copycat’ of its Everyday Sling

Peak Design has taken to YouTube to call out Amazon for what it claims is a ‘knockoff’ version of its Everyday Sling that appears in the company's Basics range.

In lighthearted video entitled 'A Tale of Two Slings', Peak Design highlights similarities between the $21 Amazon Basics Everyday Sling Bag and the company’s $80 Everyday Sling Bag, which was first released in 2017. The San Francisco-based company refrains from directly attacking Amazon, opting instead to highlight – in rather a tongue-in-cheek way – the difference in materials, workmanship, sustainability and labor practices used in the production of the camera bag, noting ‘you get what you pay for.’

A screenshot from the video showing the Amazon Basics Everyday Sling (black, left) compared to the Peak Design Everyday Sling (grey, right).

‘Designing incredible products is hard work. It takes years to dial in the materials, the features, the details,’ says Peak Design in an email newsletter accompanied by the video. ‘When we found out Amazon copied the design (and name) of our Everyday Sling and started selling it as their own, we had a bit of a moment.’ In response, Peak Design says it ‘got the grumpies out of [its] system real fast’ by making the video.

A screenshot of the Peak Design Everyday Sling 3L product page on Amazon. As of the time of publication, Amazon had already changed the name of the bag to ‘Amazon Basics Camera Bag.’ It was previously called the Amazon Basics Everyday Sling.

In the video’s description, Peak Design says:

‘It’s our goal to make the best things. If we tried to make the cheapest things, we wouldn’t be us. Amazon reminded us of that. We appreciate the pep talk, Amazon.’

Peak Design concludes the description thanking its customers for 'supporting intense, obsessive design that focuses on novel solutions to real problems [and] design practices that account for a product’s lifecycle, and its external impact on people and the planet.

DPReview is an editorially independent, wholly-owned subsidiary of Amazon